Reverse Engineering Storm Worm

The Storm Worm (dubbed so by the Finnish company F-Secure) is a backdoor / Trojan horse that affects computers using Microsoft operating systems, discovered on January 17, 2007. The worm is also known as:

  • Small.dam or Trojan-Downloader.Win32.Small.dam (F-Secure)
  • CME-711 (MITRE)
  • W32/Nuwar@MM and Downloader-BAI (specific variant) (McAfee)
  • Troj/Dorf and Mal/Dorf (Sophos)
  • Trojan.DL.Tibs.Gen!Pac13[3]
  • Trojan.Downloader-647
  • Trojan.Peacomm (Symantec)
  • TROJ_SMALL.EDW (Trend Micro)
  • Win32/Nuwar (ESET)
  • Win32/Nuwar.N@MM!CME-711 (Windows Live OneCare)
  • W32/Zhelatin (F-Secure and Kaspersky)
  • Trojan.Peed, Trojan.Tibs (BitDefender)

The Storm Worm began attacking thousands of (mostly private) computers in Europe and the United States on Friday, January 19, 2007, using an e-mail message with a subject line about a recent weather disaster, “230 dead as storm batters Europe”.[6] During the weekend there were six subsequent waves of the attack.[7] As of January 22, 2007, the Storm Worm accounted for 8% of all malware infections globally. Continue reading “Reverse Engineering Storm Worm” »

Banking Malware 101

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This video will give you an overview about banking malware. What it is and how it works.

If you think you can rely solely on your bank’s internet security to protect you, think again. Researchers at IBM Security have uncovered new malware that targets consumers in order to steal money from their accounts.

“We already know of $4 million that was stolen by this malware,” said Etay Maor, an executive advisor with IBM Security. The worst part: It’s still out there.

Continue reading “Banking Malware 101” »

Banking Malware 101

Placeholder Image

This video will give you an overview about banking malware. What it is and how it works.

If you think you can rely solely on your bank’s internet security to protect you, think again. Researchers at IBM Security have uncovered new malware that targets consumers in order to steal money from their accounts.

“We already know of $4 million that was stolen by this malware,” said Etay Maor, an executive advisor with IBM Security. The worst part: It’s still out there.

Continue reading “Banking Malware 101” »